The Queen with Speaking Eyes

 

Once upon a time in a land tucked below a blanket of glimmering tree tops that lay beneath the gaze of a blushing crimson sky, there crept a seclusion of hope and honey where people together laughed and cried. There rested a home of a beloved kingdom’s queen. A queen, who like all others was beautiful, charming and a caring delight, yet quite unlike. She was no ordinary queen as she was one with a pair of puzzling eyes, which her public proclaimed as speaking eyes. They claimed it granted an enchanted sight that spoke to the souls of all men and women alike, making all do as the queen would like. In her state, there crept no peeping corners with watery eyes, no empty rooms of forgotten family nights or even crazed men with godly plights. All was as she meant to be, no one or thing unlike. The queen’s empire soared, and with every triumph of peace and harmony that bore, her name flew beyond the horizon just a bit more. Each day a new suitor arrived to adore the magical queen, begging for her hand in  matrimony. But each time, they all left with an unanswered question and an uncertain queen behind. With all the queen could do, she could never tell if whether it was the queen herself  or the eyes that lured those men behind.  She thought of her eyes to be her greatest curse. Tired  of her pain,  she asked of her mother, the former queen, to explain. Her mother replied that “the king and I suffered a great ordeal in our efforts for the kingdom, and this seemed a way the world evened us out by granting to our daughter at which we ourselves could never arrive.” Tired of her mother’s givings that felt more a restriction than rejuvenation, the unsatisfied daughter left her mother side in a harsh sigh.

In her rage, she gathered three of her most reliable advisors and asked of each for a cure. The first came back with the unusual demand of placing the queen inside of an opaque box. The box would have the smallest slit, he explained, just wide enough for a piece of paper to pass by. The advisor claimed that if the queen could not see or hear her audience and only gave written instructions for her loyal subjects to follow, hence, one could know tell who they really followed, the queen or her eyes. And so, the queen demanded for her a royal box be built from where within she would live the next few days. Day and night she stood locked within the enclosed chambers, only exchanging her directions and conversations with the world outside on scribbled upon paper through the slight. In spite of all her troubles, the quest bore no fruit as the public still followed the queen on hands and feat.

After the first failed attempt, now the queen gave an ear to what her second advisor had to say. He boastfully claimed that he had come up with several potions that could put an end to her magical dilemma. He made the queen try a bunch for days on end, each day a fresh that tasted more bitter, darker and dizzier than the last. With all his effort, he attained no results and only a mess of unwanted outcomes. One potion caused the queen to grow enormous swollen feat, while another made her almost drown in her own sweat and the rest caused her hair to tangle upwards as if a bird’s nest. Again tired and disappointed, the queen took solace in the experiment’s end.

With falling hope and a faint heart, she turned to her last advisor. He, unlike others, offered nothing but a few words  that “the true test of love is in its absence, within the pain felt behind of a deserted lover.” He asked for the queen to discreetly run and hide within the dense mists of the forest beyond her kingdom’s lines, and wait for one who would come unannounced looking behind. The one who came yearning to ease his pain undirected or mystically drawn, is the one you want, he explained. Following his advice, the queen one night fled and left to hide.

First passed the days and then the months, with each adding day in seclusion the queen’s heart broke and fell as someone had yet to come. As more time riddled by, her pain turned into anger, and the more angry she got the more resilient she became. She learned to live alone, without a face to make her laugh or cry, except her own. Living off whatever she was lucky enough to find or willed enough to obtain from her a new unconquered land. The queen had finally began to learn how to live on her own.

After years in desertion of love, the queen, now aged and tested, on a sudden confident morning took the passage towards her far left behind kingdom, once her beloved home. On entering her old place gates, she had nothing but to gain astonishment. The palace, the market streets or even the children’s mimicry seemed left untouched as if she had never left, all marked by her silhouette and presence. She walked further more and around, only to finally rest puzzled beneath her still unmoved bronze effigy. A statue that reminded all of her and what she did, even if all was now forgotten by her. In her daze, he approached a boy playing nearby by, “Why does she still stand?” she asked. The boy resolutely replied “She was once our beloved queen, who took care of our every need. With her, we need not worry about anything, she was always there to take our care. But one day she disappeared, and no one knew where or why. Everyone was in a panic. We looked and looked, but without our leader there stood none to unite us in her search. Everyone just scrambled arbitrarily from here to there, and came up with nowhere.Each of the queen’s advisor tried to take advantage of our hate and suspicion and made a claim to her throne, but all were vanquished in their mindless struggle for power. With time, we learned to trust and care for each other.  In her absence, we were all forced to live together, and not just beside each other as we did before. We formed a democracy and elected leaders, we finally became community. Even though we never found out what happened to our queen, we like to believe that her departure was meant to teach us a lesson.”

“And what may that be?” asked the queen quite frantically. The boy proudly replied “loving one means learning to let them go, because it is only in desperation that they learn to love. Today, my queen may not be by my side, but it was her love for me that taught me to love.”

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